Are you sure?

Terms and Conditions

Spartan is a project that has been in the making for some time now and over the next few months we’ll continue to learn more about the new browser, what it has to offer users, and what its platform will look like. It will be a matter of few months until users and developers alike will be able to try Spartan for themselves, but we can share some of the interesting bits already today. This article will cover the inside story of the rendering engine powering Spartan, how it came to be, and how 20 years of the Internet Explorer platform (Trident) has helped inform how our team designed it.

Lessons Learned From Internet Explorer

Twenty years ago, Microsoft first introduced Internet Explorer to the world. For many users, it’s a household name and a brand recognized across the globe, but for web developers, those quirky older versions of Internet Explorer often make it difficult to recognize Microsoft’s recent efforts in supporting and implementing web standards. Though Internet Explorer’s legacy versions are likely to be remembered by web developers for bugs, hacks and dirty workarounds, IE did shape the web in a positive way for web developers by bringing CSS, dynamic HTML scripting and the DOM, AJAX/XMLHttpRequest, drag drop, innerHTML, hardware acceleration, and other technologies to the web.

On the browser team at Microsoft, we consider ourselves a learning organization. Each year, we take the time to reflect on our achievements and our failures to learn and grow. From that, each release of IE has made a lasting impact on how we engineer. Our learnings about the importance of cooperation amongst browser vendors, standards, compatibility, interoperability, performance, and security all come together to shape how we designed our new rendering engine.

Microsoft’s New Rendering Engine

The new Microsoft browser is going to be powered by a new rendering engine, EdgeHTML.dll. Windows 10 already has it integrated, and it will be separate from Trident (MSHTML.dll) that powered Internet Explorer for decades.

As we know, the latest versions of Trident powering Internet Explorer 11, did show a remarkable support for standards (I started to make a list of some of the notable ones, but stopped after I hit 75 specs). But its progress was heavily weighed down by the burden of legacy support for IE5.5, IE7, IE8, IE9, and IE10 document modes — a concept the web no longer needs.

So we set about to create a new engine using IE11’s standards support as a baseline. I watched Justin Rogers, one of our engineers, press “Enter” on the commit that forked the engine—it took almost 45 minutes just to process it (just committing the changes, not building!). When it completed, there was a liberating silence when we realized what this now enabled us to do: delete code, every developer’s favorite catharsis.

In the coming months, swathes of IE legacy were deleted from the new engine. Gone were document modes. Removed was the subsystem responsible for emulating IE8 layout quirks. VBScript eliminated. Remnants like attachEvent, X-UA-Compatible, currentStyle were all purged from the new engine. The codebase looks little like Trident anymore (far more diverged already than even Blink is from WebKit).

Lessons Learned From Internet Explorer

Twenty years ago, Microsoft first introduced Internet Explorer to the world. For many users, it’s a household name and a brand recognized across the globe, but for web developers, those quirky older versions of Internet Explorer often make it difficult to recognize Microsoft’s recent efforts in supporting and implementing web standards. Though Internet Explorer’s legacy versions are likely to be remembered by web developers for bugs, hacks and dirty workarounds, IE did shape the web in a positive way for web developers by bringing CSS, dynamic HTML scripting and the DOM, AJAX/XMLHttpRequest, drag drop, innerHTML, hardware acceleration, and other technologies to the web.

On the browser team at Microsoft, we consider ourselves a learning organization. Each year, we take the time to reflect on our achievements and our failures to learn and grow. From that, each release of IE has made a lasting impact on how we engineer. Our learnings about the importance of cooperation amongst browser vendors, standards, compatibility, interoperability, performance, and security all come together to shape how we designed our new rendering engine.

Microsoft’s New Rendering Engine

The new Microsoft browser is going to be powered by a new rendering engine, EdgeHTML.dll. Windows 10 already has it integrated, and it will be separate from Trident (MSHTML.dll) that powered Internet Explorer for decades.

As we know, the latest versions of Trident powering Internet Explorer 11, did show a remarkable support for standards (I started to make a list of some of the notable ones, but stopped after I hit 75 specs). But its progress was heavily weighed down by the burden of legacy support for IE5.5, IE7, IE8, IE9, and IE10 document modes — a concept the web no longer needs.

So we set about to create a new engine using IE11’s standards support as a baseline. I watched Justin Rogers, one of our engineers, press “Enter” on the commit that forked the engine—it took almost 45 minutes just to process it (just committing the changes, not building!). When it completed, there was a liberating silence when we realized what this now enabled us to do: delete code, every developer’s favorite catharsis.

In the coming months, swathes of IE legacy were deleted from the new engine. Gone were document modes. Removed was the subsystem responsible for emulating IE8 layout quirks. VBScript eliminated. Remnants like attachEvent, X-UA-Compatible, currentStyle were all purged from the new engine. The codebase looks little like Trident anymore (far more diverged already than even Blink is from WebKit).

Lessons Learned From Internet Explorer

Twenty years ago, Microsoft first introduced Internet Explorer to the world. For many users, it’s a household name and a brand recognized across the globe, but for web developers, those quirky older versions of Internet Explorer often make it difficult to recognize Microsoft’s recent efforts in supporting and implementing web standards. Though Internet Explorer’s legacy versions are likely to be remembered by web developers for bugs, hacks and dirty workarounds, IE did shape the web in a positive way for web developers by bringing CSS, dynamic HTML scripting and the DOM, AJAX/XMLHttpRequest, drag drop, innerHTML, hardware acceleration, and other technologies to the web.

On the browser team at Microsoft, we consider ourselves a learning organization. Each year, we take the time to reflect on our achievements and our failures to learn and grow. From that, each release of IE has made a lasting impact on how we engineer. Our learnings about the importance of cooperation amongst browser vendors, standards, compatibility, interoperability, performance, and security all come together to shape how we designed our new rendering engine.

Microsoft’s New Rendering Engine

The new Microsoft browser is going to be powered by a new rendering engine, EdgeHTML.dll. Windows 10 already has it integrated, and it will be separate from Trident (MSHTML.dll) that powered Internet Explorer for decades.

As we know, the latest versions of Trident powering Internet Explorer 11, did show a remarkable support for standards (I started to make a list of some of the notable ones, but stopped after I hit 75 specs). But its progress was heavily weighed down by the burden of legacy support for IE5.5, IE7, IE8, IE9, and IE10 document modes — a concept the web no longer needs.

So we set about to create a new engine using IE11’s standards support as a baseline. I watched Justin Rogers, one of our engineers, press “Enter” on the commit that forked the engine—it took almost 45 minutes just to process it (just committing the changes, not building!). When it completed, there was a liberating silence when we realized what this now enabled us to do: delete code, every developer’s favorite catharsis.

In the coming months, swathes of IE legacy were deleted from the new engine. Gone were document modes. Removed was the subsystem responsible for emulating IE8 layout quirks. VBScript eliminated. Remnants like attachEvent, X-UA-Compatible, currentStyle were all purged from the new engine. The codebase looks little like Trident anymore (far more diverged already than even Blink is from WebKit).

Lessons Learned From Internet Explorer

Twenty years ago, Microsoft first introduced Internet Explorer to the world. For many users, it’s a household name and a brand recognized across the globe, but for web developers, those quirky older versions of Internet Explorer often make it difficult to recognize Microsoft’s recent efforts in supporting and implementing web standards. Though Internet Explorer’s legacy versions are likely to be remembered by web developers for bugs, hacks and dirty workarounds, IE did shape the web in a positive way for web developers by bringing CSS, dynamic HTML scripting and the DOM, AJAX/XMLHttpRequest, drag drop, innerHTML, hardware acceleration, and other technologies to the web.

On the browser team at Microsoft, we consider ourselves a learning organization. Each year, we take the time to reflect on our achievements and our failures to learn and grow. From that, each release of IE has made a lasting impact on how we engineer. Our learnings about the importance of cooperation amongst browser vendors, standards, compatibility, interoperability, performance, and security all come together to shape how we designed our new rendering engine.

Microsoft’s New Rendering Engine

The new Microsoft browser is going to be powered by a new rendering engine, EdgeHTML.dll. Windows 10 already has it integrated, and it will be separate from Trident (MSHTML.dll) that powered Internet Explorer for decades.

As we know, the latest versions of Trident powering Internet Explorer 11, did show a remarkable support for standards (I started to make a list of some of the notable ones, but stopped after I hit 75 specs). But its progress was heavily weighed down by the burden of legacy support for IE5.5, IE7, IE8, IE9, and IE10 document modes — a concept the web no longer needs.

So we set about to create a new engine using IE11’s standards support as a baseline. I watched Justin Rogers, one of our engineers, press “Enter” on the commit that forked the engine—it took almost 45 minutes just to process it (just committing the changes, not building!). When it completed, there was a liberating silence when we realized what this now enabled us to do: delete code, every developer’s favorite catharsis.

In the coming months, swathes of IE legacy were deleted from the new engine. Gone were document modes. Removed was the subsystem responsible for emulating IE8 layout quirks. VBScript eliminated. Remnants like attachEvent, X-UA-Compatible, currentStyle were all purged from the new engine. The codebase looks little like Trident anymore (far more diverged already than even Blink is from WebKit).

Lessons Learned From Internet Explorer

Twenty years ago, Microsoft first introduced Internet Explorer to the world. For many users, it’s a household name and a brand recognized across the globe, but for web developers, those quirky older versions of Internet Explorer often make it difficult to recognize Microsoft’s recent efforts in supporting and implementing web standards. Though Internet Explorer’s legacy versions are likely to be remembered by web developers for bugs, hacks and dirty workarounds, IE did shape the web in a positive way for web developers by bringing CSS, dynamic HTML scripting and the DOM, AJAX/XMLHttpRequest, drag drop, innerHTML, hardware acceleration, and other technologies to the web.

On the browser team at Microsoft, we consider ourselves a learning organization. Each year, we take the time to reflect on our achievements and our failures to learn and grow. From that, each release of IE has made a lasting impact on how we engineer. Our learnings about the importance of cooperation amongst browser vendors, standards, compatibility, interoperability, performance, and security all come together to shape how we designed our new rendering engine.

Microsoft’s New Rendering Engine

The new Microsoft browser is going to be powered by a new rendering engine, EdgeHTML.dll. Windows 10 already has it integrated, and it will be separate from Trident (MSHTML.dll) that powered Internet Explorer for decades.

As we know, the latest versions of Trident powering Internet Explorer 11, did show a remarkable support for standards (I started to make a list of some of the notable ones, but stopped after I hit 75 specs). But its progress was heavily weighed down by the burden of legacy support for IE5.5, IE7, IE8, IE9, and IE10 document modes — a concept the web no longer needs.

So we set about to create a new engine using IE11’s standards support as a baseline. I watched Justin Rogers, one of our engineers, press “Enter” on the commit that forked the engine—it took almost 45 minutes just to process it (just committing the changes, not building!). When it completed, there was a liberating silence when we realized what this now enabled us to do: delete code, every developer’s favorite catharsis.

In the coming months, swathes of IE legacy were deleted from the new engine. Gone were document modes. Removed was the subsystem responsible for emulating IE8 layout quirks. VBScript eliminated. Remnants like attachEvent, X-UA-Compatible, currentStyle were all purged from the new engine. The codebase looks little like Trident anymore (far more diverged already than even Blink is from WebKit).

This is the new level of dating
take the guesswork out of online dating!